Policing what you say is the first step in regulating what you think

Barack Obama making speech

Personal censorship is driven in part by the need to be emotionally assimilated by the collective. When we break the rules on being politically correct we are subject to ostracism. After we have edited taboo words from our language, it isn’t long before we edit them from our thought process. Eventually we not only edit what we say, but what we think as well. We are so motivated by our infantile need for acceptance that we feel the sting of guilt not just for what we have said, but, importantly, for what we think.

President Barack Obama broke with a policy that was set down by Thomas Jefferson and has been, for the most part, adhered to until last week when stacks of shrink wrapped, unmarked cash totaling $400 million was flown clandestinely in an unmarked plane to Iran.

As the plane rolled across the Tehran tarmac in the dark of night, another plane, this one holding four American hostages, was finally cleared for takeoff. It doesn’t take someone with a suspicious mind or keen intellect to see that Obama had again stepped outside the law, this time to pay ransom for American hostages. In fact, it takes someone without a mind to believe otherwise. It takes a retard.

That last word caught your attention didn’t it? That’s because I just broke the social contract that society has over the use of forbidden words. It is a growing list because it encompasses any word that has the potential to offend.

The thing is, I don’t remember signing this contract. I believe I would remember agreeing with a tort I find reprehensible, especially when it is used against good people like the Republican’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump.

Trump is crucified for using forbidden words while the reckless, and perhaps even criminal, acts committed by Hillary Clinton, her husband and former-President Bill Clinton and Obama are swept under the carpet like dead flies.

So even when Obama bundles up $400 million dollars and attempts to clandestinely buy freedom for hostages, there is nary a criticism from the mainstream media with the exception of Fox News. Yet Heaven help the Republicans when Trump uses words that have been censored by the liberal left.

Personal censorship is driven in part by the need to be emotionally assimilated by the collective. When we break the rules on being politically correct we are subject to ostracism. After we have edited taboo words from our language, it isn’t long before we edit them from our thought process. Eventually we not only edit what we say, but what we think as well. We are so motivated by our infantile need for acceptance that we feel the sting of guilt not just for what we have said, but, importantly, for what we think.

At any age, guilt drives us to conform. But it is most easily programed into children through a public education system that uses techniques not so different from the methods employed by the Hitler Youth of Germany or the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

The only sub groups that seem immune to societal dictates are the very rich and the very old. Clint Eastwood is both.

Earlier this month, Esquire published an interview with Clint Eastwood who, at 86, is finishing up the 35th film he has directed in a Hollywood career that began in 1955. Eastwood has seen a lot of changes in society over six decades, and I wanted to share his specific thoughts on political correctness:

ESQ: Your characters have become touchstones in the culture, whether it’s Reagan invoking “Make my day” or now Trump … I swear he’s even practiced your scowl.

Eastwood: Maybe. But he’s onto something, because secretly everybody’s getting tired of political correctness, kissing up. That’s the kiss-ass generation we’re in right now. We’re really in a pussy generation. Everybody’s walking on eggshells. We see people accusing people of being racist and all kinds of stuff. When I grew up, those things weren’t called racist. And then when I did Gran Torino, even my associate said, “This is a really good script, but it’s politically incorrect.” And I said, “Good. Let me read it tonight.” The next morning, I came in and I threw it on his desk and I said, “We’re starting this immediately.”

ESQ: What is the “pussy generation”?

CE: All these people that say, “Oh, you can’t do that, and you can’t do this, and you can’t say that.” I guess it’s just the times.

Another old, rich guy is Trump. Eastwood shared his thoughts on the Republican presidential candidate. “He’s said a lot of dumb things… But everybody — the press and everybody’s going, ‘Oh, well, that’s racist,’ and they’re making a big hoodoo out of it. Just fucking get over it. It’s a sad time in history.”

To read the August 3, 2016 Esquire interview in its entirety, click here.

It doesn’t take a crystal ball to see that Trump is going to lose this November. He has been ridiculed by mainstream media and the Clinton campaign has labelled him a racist because of some of his statements. Trump has the audacity to say the obvious in an age where people don’t care what is right, but insist on what is political correct. While Trump may say that we can no longer afford to be politically correct, he and Eastwood are but a few voices trying but failing to be heard over the media din.

Not being politically correct is partly why Trump is lagging behind Clinton by double digits in recent polls. It doesn’t seem to matter that Clinton has been tested in leadership roles and has failed miserably. Or that she lied to Americans about the 2012 Islamic terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya which took four American lives. Or that she has not one good explanation in forwarding material marked “classified” on an authorized email account with an unauthorized electronic device.

Last month, FBI Director James B. Comey said that while he was not qualified to weigh in on Clinton’s public statements, his findings contradicted what she said.

So while Clinton may be a habitual liar, she is at least a politically-correct liar.

The 1st Amendment provides for “abridging the freedom of speech.” This includes the right “to use certain offensive words and phrases to convey political messages.” It was upheld in the 1971 decision of Cohen v. California, 403 U.S. 15.

In 2016, the words “free speech” are becoming a euphemism. Most of us closely monitor what we say for fear of the derision for using the “wrong” word. This is one reason great men and women no longer seek the presidency. Honest, independent and outspoken speech, the mark of a good leader, disqualifies them from political office. The notion that Teddy Roosevelt could be elected today would be laughable if not so tragically impossible. And there is no room in today’s military for men like General George S. Patton.

Greatness cannot exist without honest and open evaluation. To that end, political correctness has condemned America to live with leaders like Obama and Clinton and a judiciary with the likes of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg. America is thus condemned to a purgatory barren of liberty and independent thought.

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